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Wednesday, 22 April 2015

Newlyweds, babies or big hair?





This week's prompt comes from the cover of a old book of cartoons that seem to be all about a very mischievous and not particularly attractive baby. I thought of writing about big hair, but hair was a previous topic. I did find this illustration in the reprint of a little book of advice I bought at the National Library of Australia bookshop recently, entitled "A Book for Every Woman", which was originally published in 1924 by the Associated School of Dressmaking, Sydney NSW.


A sweet sketch on p 43 of the reprinted book, credited as having been an illustration in the Myer Emporium Ltd, Melbourne, catalogue, Spring/Christmas 1925.


 "Don't wash any oftener than once a month and exercise by brushing rather than massage" were the words of wisdom given in the chapter on caring for your hair, and in the end they really recommended only washing it once every three months! Here is a short extract from p. 40:


Advice on hair care has rather moved on since those days!

I thought I would move on too, and change topics to that of newlyweds and babies, especially when I remembered that today (22 April) would have been the 65th wedding anniversary of my parents Jean and Ian Cruickshank. Perhaps they are now celebrating together somewhere up above.


Wedding Day 22 April 1950 in St David's Presbyterian Church, Colombo Street, Christchurch NZ


Jean and Ian with their parents, Oliver and Myrtle Cruickshank next to their son, and Jack and Mona Morrison next to their daughter. Mona looks pleased as she glances across at the happy couple, while Myrtle seems a little less so, but that's probably just my imagination. Oliver Desmond Cruickshank was an ANZAC, having fought in France from mid 1916 until the end of the war. I understand that he had shrapnel in his forehead for the rest of his life. I included a detailed account of the wedding festivities in an earlier post here last year.
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Jean and Ian's first born child arrived 2 and a half years later.  Here she is following her christening, looking wide-eyed about all the attention she would have been receiving. Looking at the baptismal certificate that Jean naturally saved, I'm sure my parents did their best to bring me up accordingly, but sad to say I've rather strayed since then.


Here's another extract from the previously mentioned  Book for Every Woman, this time from the chapter entitled 'How to Make Baby Happy':

pp. 22-23.   I hope the reference to whipping didn't relate to baby care, but it does appear on the same page!

I don't know whether my grandparents strictly followed similar recommendations when bringing up little Jean and Ian, or if my parents did so with me, but my relatively lax child care methods certainly would not have passed muster with the editors of that book. I didn't prevent our first child Claire from sucking her thumb for example, but it didn't seem to do her any harm, as she had perfect teeth, with no braces required. 

We didn't have any formal portrait shots taken of the three of us, so normally one or other of us would be behind the lens, but I do like these informal snaps with Claire in 1980. If I wanted to follow the SS prompt strictly, I'd probably be looking for photos of babies getting into all kinds of trouble, but of course I don't have many of those.  



Photo by Shutterbaby Baby and Child Photography.

Claire and her husband now have their own little baby and here is a lovely portrait of them together, taken at home in London when Isabelle was very new. That was over a year ago, and we are soon to visit her again. Meanwhile we get daily photos and updates on her progress.


Enough nostalgic photos from me - click here for other probably more -lighthearted blogs from other Sepians. 

Best wishes to all Australian and New Zealand bloggers on the centenary of ANZAC Day, 25 April 2015. We plan to commemorate it by attending a local ceremony in the Victorian town of Bungaree, where a memorial to local people who have served in world conflicts will be unveiled. Four of Isabelle's great great great uncles from the Bungaree district volunteered for WW1, and one of them, Robert Oliver Calwell, did not return. RIP Robert and his brothers William, Charles and Harry, who also served.   

Lest We Forget.





20 comments:

  1. Such beautiful photographs and memories, thank you for sharing them all. You must be excited to be planning your next visit to visit family in England. We are almost wishing the months away as our son, his wife and our two gorgeous little granddaughters are coming from Australia to spend Christmas in the UK with us this year.

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  2. You should come over here for a warm Christmas, but a traditional cold one will be fun for the little girls. I think I asked you once before if you or your sister knew any Kiddles, as they are an Alton family whose son married our daughter.

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  3. Wonderful collection. I even notice how much you look like your mom, as she looked in her wedding.

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  4. I cannot imagine my hair getting livelier & fluffier & etc. by not washing it for 3 months. Yuk! Some of the suggestions about raising babies have some small merit, but most are not only ridiculous but bad ideas. Letting a baby cry until it finally gives up only teaches it that Mom can't be relied on. My daughter learned how to use special baby sign language & used it with all 3 of her children. It's amazing how smart babies really are - maybe even a bit scary. They learned very early on how to signal their Mom if they were hungry or needed to be changed, etc. & because of that remarkable ability to communicate, cried very little & were very happy babies - growing into happy, well-adjusted children.

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  5. Maybe it worked better with long hair, i don't know, but my hairdresser was horrified when I mentioned it to her. Our daughter has learnt baby sign language too and uses it with Isabelle.

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  6. I wonder what the recommended hair washing time is now. I have known some people that wash their hair every day.

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  7. A lovely collection of hairdo's and baby photographs. I certainly remember that 1960's beehive style. What a wonderful find that vintage book was - and I can see it being a great source for future blog posts. I was surprised it was as late as 1924. I can not imagine going three months without washing my hair - ugh!!

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  8. I can't imagine washing my hair only once a month. I'd be scratching myself silly. The advice on raising babies was amusing too.

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  9. Horrible advice for baby care and mothering. The hair advice sounds bad too - 3 months?

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  10. I do like reading those old instructions......they are very amusing now. 1 - 3 months! No Way! I know it is not good but I wash my hair every work day!

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  11. I have a friend who NEVER uses shampoo -- just water and finger massage -- and her hair looks just wonderful all the time; nice sheen with those natural oils. But it still can't try it myself!

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  12. No, I couldn’t go three monthes either! Thanks for a glimpse into that rather quaint book with it’s very strange advice. I enjoyed your family photos too; you certainly are like your mother.

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  13. Lovely photos, great book of as Marilyn called it strange advice, as is often common from back in the day. Great memories for you.

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  14. I must try washing my hair with just water and a massage, but definitely more then every 3 months!!!

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  15. I knew there were going to be lots of baby photos this week.

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  16. Like Brett I guessed babies, but I'm surprised that so many hair style photos and history made the cut too. Given the amount of dust and grime that our ancestors tolerated, the advice on hair care seems very odd.

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  17. I love the progression of photos, and how great to have this particular prompt line up with their anniversary! I have to weigh in on the hair washing (since everyone else has) - the new trend for curly haired folks is to never use shampoo - just conditioner and water basically and only wash it twice a week. Speaking as a curly girl, it really works SO much better to not use traditional shampoos with harsh detergents that strip all the oil from your hair. Curly hair tends to be dry and fragile anyway - since I made the change, my curls are much bouncier and I can go 6+ months between haircuts!

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  18. I agree with Melissa...my friends who have "straightened" hair are advised not to use shampoo at all.
    Myself, I'm a chronic washer and don't feel ready to present to the world without a shampoo and blow dry. That photo of your daughter and son is splendid.

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  19. Lovely post. Like the photos and especially the stories. You must be looking forward to your visit.

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  20. great theme photos --- from hair, to weddings and babies. Especially like the wedding pics of your folks. Very nice.

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